The Era of Emotional Advertising is Upon Us

I absolutely adore advertising. I wouldn’t be writing this blog if I didn’t. But ask me a few months ago if I thought that advertising was a form of true art, and I would’ve said no.

You see, to me, art in its highest form is transcendence from the material. It’s the closest one can get to connecting the desires and emotional state of the inside mind with the outside world.  Advertising is created with the express purpose of selling a product or service–materialism–therefore it leaves little room to be defined as art the way I think of it.

However, I feel that the past year has reiterated a sort of transcendence for advertising in and of itself.  Is advertising’s end goal still to sell stuff? Of course, but companies have increasingly been willing to use advertising as a vehicle that speaks to the human condition. And a year of emotionally driven  advertising has reminded me that advertising can indeed be a form of high art.

All this emotional advertising seems to have started a little over a year ago with “Halftime in America“, a commercial for Chrysler by Wieden + Kennedy. The commercial aired during the Super Bowl and spoke directly to a country that, like Chrysler, was down and out. Beautifully written and executed, “Halftime in America”  silenced rooms across the country. Afterwards, other emotionally charged ads  like “Farmer” for Dodge RAM and “Thank You Mom” for P&G appeared.

These ads prove that companies are waking up to the fact that it pays to brand human. Playing to emotions creates brand advocates and it’s good for the bottom line. People don’t want to open their wallet for a giant mega corporation richer than a country, they want to open their wallet to someone that gets them on the most basic level.

4 Recent Ads that Will Make You Cry (With Joy)

1. “Nana” for Cheerios by Saatchi & Saatchi NY

2. “A Letter to Mom” for Famous Footwear by Y&R

3. “The Animal Family” for Skype by Pereira & O’Dell

4.  “Made for Mankind” for Acura by Mullen

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Tragedy Strikes, Humanity Reigns

The tragedy yesterday was shocking for all Boston area natives. But for people who are also ad mavens in the making, like me, it was  depressing  how insensitive some national brands were on social media.

How hard would it be to have a human being monitoring a brand’s social media? It’s not like most of these brands can’t afford a social media expert or two. Besides, this tragedy happened when work was still in session across most of the USA, so someone should have been around to stop these promotional tweets from getting out in the first place.

Unfortunately, many brands had their Twitter set to automatically post and no one was able to stop their release. Other brands were able to pull their promotional tweets in time or delete them soon after.

It’s really sad when people are losing life and limb  and all you get from Burger King is a promotion for coffee.

https://twitter.com/beefsteakcharly/status/324056423631831040

In contrast to Burger King, fast food giants like Wendy’s and Taco Bell quickly deleted their  tweets.  But they weren’t able to stop them from going up in the first place. McDonald’s was one of the only major fast food chains to directly respond to the tragedy.

It isn’t all bad in ad land, though. Some New England based companies did more than respond– they acted with heart.  Local restaurant chains Fire+Ice and Joe’s American Bar & Grill passed out food to officers and emergency crew.

On the national level, Southwest Airlines was quick to accommodate people, giving homage to the age-old saying that actions speak louder than words.

This type of response shows the importance of the human element in branding. It’s a reminder that the best brands are driven by interaction and an emotional core–they aren’t mindless robots.